top of page
  • Ottodot Singapore

Electromagnets: Most Common Open-Ended Questions & How to Tackle Them Confidently

Updated: Jun 11

5 types of Open-Ended Questions

  • Stating Questions

  • Comparison Questions

  • Prediction Questions

  • Conclusion Questions

  • Explanation Questions


Open-ended questions (OEQs) in science exams can be tricky, especially when it comes to complex topics like electromagnets. But fear not! By understanding the common types of OEQs and some smart strategies, you can tackle them like a pro. Here’s a breakdown:


Type # 1 - Stating Questions


This type of questions requires students to recall and regurgitate key Science concepts.


Students must:

  • Recall the correct Science concept.

  • Use Science keywords.


Example: 

Answer

  • Coil more turns around the electromagnet.

  • Use more batteries.


How can you identify such questions?

  • Look out for questions that use terms like ‘state’, ‘list’, ‘describe’, ‘which’, ‘suggest’ and phrases like ‘state two ways/another way’

Why does your child struggle with this type of questions?

Some possible reasons:

  • Hidden misconceptions or conceptual gaps

  • Weaker ability in distilling the correct concept


Type # 2 - Comparison Questions


This type of questions requires students to contrast two different setups/observations/scenarios/object.


Students must:

  • Structure answers to show the comparison between two setups/scenarios.

  • E.g. ‘... less than/more than …’ or ‘... is stronger than/weaker than...’.


Example: 

Answer

  • The battery was stronger in set-up P than in set-up Q.


How can you identify such questions?

  • Look out for questions that use terms like ‘than’, ‘compare’ and

  • phrases like ‘what is the difference between ...’


Why does your child struggle with this type of questions?

While some students can identify the difference between two scenarios/objects, they lose marks when they do not structure their answers to show a comparison.


Type # 3 - Prediction Questions


This type of questions requires students to extrapolate based on the given data and use the right keywords.


Students must:

  • Interpret given data and develop a hypothesis.

  • Extrapolate the data based on the hypothesis.

  • Use the right keywords.


Example:


Answer

  • 0. The iron nail will be demagnetised and lose its magnetism.


How can you identify such questions?

Look out for questions that use terms like ‘predict’ and phrases like ‘what do you think will happen’.


Why does your child struggle with this type of questions?

Some possible reasons:

  • Unsure of how to interpret the data given.

  • A lack of confidence can affect your child’s ability to develop a hypothesis and extrapolate the data given.


Prediction questions are also often coupled with an explanation question. This adds to the complexity of the question.


Type # 4 - Conclusion Questions

This type of questions requires students to interpret data given and draw a conclusion. This is a very common question type especially in experiment-based questions.


Students must:

  • Use the right Science keywords.

  • Structure answers in a relational manner.

  • E.g. ‘When ... , the ...’ or ‘As ... increases/decreases, ...


Example

Answer

As the number the coils of wire around the iron nail increased, the number of steel clips attracted to the iron nail increased.


How can you identify such questions?

Look out for questions that use phrases ‘draw a relationship’, ‘what can you conclude’, ‘what can you tell’ or ‘what was the aim’.


Why does your child struggle with this type of questions?

Some possible reasons:

Your child might not know how to interpret the data given (usually in graphs or charts)

Hidden conceptual gaps can prevent your child from drawing a valid conclusion

Unable to structure answers in a relational manner

E.g. ‘When..., the...’ or ‘As... increases/decreases,... ‘ (‘what is the relationship’)

E.g. It is to find out if...will affect...(‘what is the aim...’)


Type # 5 Explanation Questions

This type of questions requires students to elaborate on the observation and explain using a Science concept.


Students must:

  • Elaborate on the observation.

  • Explain the concept behind the observation.

  • Use the right Science keywords.


Example

Answer

The magnetised steel bar and the magnet repelled each other (elaborating on the observation) as the like poles of the steel bar and the magnet were facing each other. Like poles of magnets repel each other (explaining the underlying concept).


How can you identify such questions?


Look out for questions that use phrases like ‘explain why’, ‘explain her observation’, ‘why do you think...’ or ‘give a reason’.


Why does your child struggle with this type of questions?

Some possible reasons:

  • Your child might tend to leave out elaborating the observation and jump straight to the concept.

  • Or only describe the observation and not the underlying concept.

  • Hidden misconceptions or conceptual gaps.

  • Not using the right Science keywords.


As you dive into learning about electromagnets with our comprehensive guide, Ottodot has an exceptional offering to enhance your learning journey. Ottodot’s online classes make learning fun by using Ottodot's Roblox Science games, which are thoughtfully designed to align seamlessly with Singapore MOE SCIENCE standards for Primary School students.

Now, your child can get better at understanding electromagnets and other science topics by playing fun games at home.

For a limited time, join our First Class for just S$25 and discover a new way of learning that's exciting. Help your child explore science with Ottodot today!

Talk to Us Or find out more about our classes here.

39 views0 comments

Коментари


bottom of page